Westfield's Dental Department

Posts for: November, 2013

By Kenneth Krause, DMD
November 27, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tmj   tmd  
AnsweringCommonQuestionsonTMJDisorders

You have probably heard a lot of people talk about TMJ disorders, but do you know what it all means? How do you know if you are suffering from a TMJ disorder?

Below are answers to some common questions about TMJ disorders.

What is a TMJ disorder?
First, we should explain that TMJ actually refers to the Temporomandibular Joint, which is the formal name for your jaw joint(s). TMD stands for Temporomandibular Disorders, which is the correct name for the muscle and/or joint symptoms that commonly arise when there is TMJ pain and dysfunction. You may have heard people refer to the actual disorder as TMJ, but this name is incorrect.

When I experience TMJ pain, what exactly is happening?
Let's first understand all of the parts that play a role in your pain. The temporomandibular joints connect your mandible (lower jaw) to your skull on both the left and right sides, which makes the lower jaw the only bone in the body with completely symmetrical joints at both ends. There is a ball-and-socket relationship between your jaw and your skull on both sides, but the unique part is the presence of a cushioning disk between the two surfaces in each joint. Each TMJ has a disk between the ball (condyle) and socket (fossa), and this sometimes ends up being an especially important area when trouble arises.

So, how do I know if I have TMD?
You can never be absolutely sure, but here are some symptoms you should be sure to share with us during your examination:

  • Clicking. You may experience a clicking sound in the jaw, usually due to a shift in the position of the disk inside the joint. However, if you do not have pain or limited jaw function, this symptom may be insignificant.
  • Muscle Pain. The next symptom is jaw muscle pain, usually in the cheeks or temples. If the muscle is sore or stiff in the morning, this pain is usually related to clenching or grinding in your sleep. However, there are more complex muscle pains that can spread to your head and neck.
  • TMJ Pain. This third symptom refers to pain actually inside one or both of your jaw joints, technically described as arthritis of the TMJ.

If diagnosed, what can I expect from treatment?
We will first need to assess the damage to your TMJ, and from there we will recommend a course of treatment to relieve your pain. Treatment may range from hot or cold compresses and anti-inflammatory medications to physical therapy or a bite guard. We may also advise you to do jaw exercises at home. In general, we will do our best to treat your issue without orthodontic treatment or surgery.

If you would like more information about TMD, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Seeking Relief from TMD.”


By Kenneth Krause, DMD
November 12, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
LeaMichelesWiseDentalDecision

Not long ago, Glee star Lea Michele had all of her wisdom teeth removed. This is a very common procedure that people in their twenties, like Michele, often undergo to prevent serious dental problems down the road. The actress found that the procedure really was actually not very difficult to tolerate.

“Feeling all better from my surgery!” she tweeted to fans a few days later. “Back to work tomorrow.”

Why do wisdom teeth so often cause problems? For one thing, they come in years later than the other 28 permanent teeth — usually between the ages of 17 and 25. By that time, there is often no room in the jaw to accommodate them. As man has evolved, the jaws have actually become smaller in size — often creating a lack of space for the wisdom teeth to erupt into proper position. If wisdom teeth become blocked (impacted) by other molars that are already there, infection and damage to neighboring teeth may result.

Sometimes the wisdom teeth themselves cause the problem by growing in at an odd angle. They push against other teeth, often compromising the adjacent tooth's supporting bone. While you would think pain would occur if any of these problems were present, that does not always alert us to a wisdom-tooth problem. It's usually diagnosed with the help of x-rays.

Wisdom tooth extraction is often performed in the dental office using a local anesthetic (numbing shot) to keep you from experiencing any pain, along with conscious sedation to help you relax. The type of anesthesia that's best for you will be determined before the procedure.

After we gently remove the tooth or teeth, you may need to have the site sutured (stitched) to promote healing. You will rest for a short time before going home, and may need to have someone drive you, depending on what type of anesthesia you were given.

Once you get home, you should apply an ice pack on the outside of your cheek for about five minutes on, five minutes off for as many hours as possible to help reduce any postoperative swelling on the first day. Starting on the second day, the warm moist heat of a washcloth placed on the cheek and hot salt water rinses will make you more comfortable. You may want to eat soft foods and brush your teeth very carefully during the recovery period, which lasts only a few days as Lea Michele discovered. Before you know it, you'll be “feeling all better!”

If you have any questions about wisdom teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Wisdom Teeth.”


When you are missing teeth, it can take a toll on your overall appearance and self-esteem.  Thankfully, with advancements in dentistry, you can now permanently replacing missing teeth with dental implants from our Westfield dentist, Dr. Kenneth Krause.
 

Let’s Take a Closer Look at Dental Implants

Dental Implants Westfield IN dentist

Both esthetic and functional, dental implants are artificial tooth replacements that allow you to, talk, laugh and eat without difficulties. Some reasons for choosing dental implants for your smile restoration include:
  • Improved appearance
  • Bone preservation
  • Tooth preservation
  • Proven quality
  • Experience a tight, secure fit
  • Can eliminate the discomfort often associated with ill-fitting dentures
 
Dental implants are so well designed that they maintain the ability to mimic the look and feel of natural teeth, making dental implants the ideal solution to replacing missing teeth. 
 
When your teeth are healthy, the root of your tooth transmits chewing forces to the jaw bones, allowing your mouth to perform basic functions of chewing and eating without discomfort.  The tooth remains stable and generally unchanged while chewing.  If one or more teeth are missing, these forces no longer are effective, potentially causing the jawbone to begin disintegrating. 
 
Dental implants may help prevent this gradual bone deterioration, since the implant replaces the natural tooth root. Unlike dental bridges, dental implants do not affect neighboring healthy teeth.  Instead, the dental implant replaces the missing tooth root and neighboring teeth remain completely intact.
 
Consult Dr. Kenneth Krause, your dentist in Westfield for more information on dental implants and to see if you are a candidate.  Not everyone is a candidate for dental implants in Westfield, but with a proper consultation with Dr. Krause, a treatment plan can be created to restore your smile.
 
Missing teeth can be a thing of the past with proper dental hygiene, and dental implants for patients in Westfield.
 
Are you missing teeth?  How did you lose your tooth, or teeth? Share your story here.